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AI in the UK: House of Lords select committee asks, are you ready, willing and able?

Added on the 16th Apr 2018 at 2:37 pm
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A report out today (16 April) from the House of Lords select committee on artificial intelligence finds that while the UK has a “unique opportunity” to shape the development of AI, it is essential that ethics take centre stage, with the report recommending the creation of a cross-sector AI Code to help mitigate the risks.

‘AI in the UK: ready, willing and able?’ concludes that the UK is in a position to shape AI for the public benefit and to lead the international community rather than “passively accept its consequences.”

The chairman of the committee, Lord Clement-Jones, said: “The UK contains leading AI companies, a dynamic academic research culture, and a vigorous start-up ecosystem as well as a host of legal, ethical, financial and linguistic strengths. We should make the most of this environment, but it is essential that ethics take centre stage in AI’s development and use.

“AI is not without its risks and the adoption of the principles proposed by the Committee will help to mitigate these. An ethical approach ensures the public trusts this technology and sees the benefits of using it. It will also prepare them to challenge its misuse.

“We want to make sure that this country remains a cutting-edge place to research and develop this exciting technology. However, start-ups can struggle to scale up on their own. Our recommendations for a growth fund for SMEs and changes to the immigration system will help to do this.

“We’ve asked whether the UK is ready willing and able to take advantage of AI. With our recommendations, it will be.”

AI Code

One of the recommendations of the report is for a cross-sector AI Code to be established, which can be adopted nationally, and internationally. The Committee’s suggested five principles for such a code are:

Artificial intelligence should be developed for the common good and benefit of humanity.

Artificial intelligence should operate on principles of intelligibility and fairness.

Artificial intelligence should not be used to diminish the data rights or privacy of individuals, families or communities.

All citizens should have the right to be educated to enable them to flourish mentally, emotionally and economically alongside artificial intelligence.

The autonomous power to hurt, destroy or deceive human beings should never be vested in artificial intelligence.

Other conclusions from the report include:

Many jobs will be enhanced by AI, many will disappear and many new, as yet unknown jobs, will be created. Significant Government investment in skills and training will be necessary to mitigate the negative effects of AI. Retraining will become a lifelong necessity.

Individuals need to be able to have greater personal control over their data, and the way in which it is used. The ways in which data is gathered and accessed needs to change, so that everyone can have fair and reasonable access to data, while citizens and consumers can protect their privacy and personal agency. This means using established concepts, such as open data, ethics advisory boards and data protection legislation, and developing new frameworks and mechanisms, such as data portability and data trusts.

The monopolisation of data by big technology companies must be avoided, and greater competition is required. The Government, with the Competition and Markets Authority, must review the use of data by large technology companies operating in the UK.

The prejudices of the past must not be unwittingly built into automated systems. The Government should incentivise the development of new approaches to the auditing of datasets used in AI, and also to encourage greater diversity in the training and recruitment of AI specialists.

Transparency in AI is needed. The industry, through the AI Council, should establish a voluntary mechanism to inform consumers when AI is being used to make significant or sensitive decisions.

At earlier stages of education, children need to be adequately prepared for working with, and using, AI. The ethical design and use of AI should become an integral part of the curriculum.

The Government should be bold and use targeted procurement to provide a boost to AI development and deployment. It could encourage the development of solutions to public policy challenges through speculative investment. There have been impressive advances in AI for healthcare, which the NHS should capitalise on.

It is not currently clear whether existing liability law will be sufficient when AI systems malfunction or cause harm to users, and clarity in this area is needed. The Committee recommend that the Law Commission investigate this issue.

The Government needs to draw up a national policy framework, in lockstep with the Industrial Strategy, to ensure the coordination and successful delivery of AI policy in the UK.

2 Comments

  1. richard hodkinson says:

    Good to see help coming to start-ups for AI. what i do see sat in the chair i occupy are vendors using the AI term liberally and by this i mean there needs to be some trade description for AI. a clever algorithm in a product does not equate to AI/machine learning or any other definition. We need some government or industry guidance to define AI and products claiming to be AI need testing against it. AI in its truest sense is a progressive evolution and not an overnight sensation ergo jobs will morph over a controllable period of time. there’s more…

  2. Dennis says:

    The UK taking an ethical approach to AI is a good idea. AI is a controversial subject that can lead to other brilliant discoveries. They could create new subsytem definitions. The policy framework will hold people accountable, which is a great idea.

Any Comment?