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Legal IT Apps: Dictation transcription on tap, thanks to new app

Added on the 6th Nov 2012 at 3:09 pm
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 The recently released free dictation app* from transcription service provider DictateNow, is proving popular with law firms and perhaps highlights the trend for lawyers to adopt a more mobile approach to their working life. The app, developed to make dictation available to everyone, everywhere, was initially created for the most popular devices in the legal sector, namely the Apple range of products and the BlackBerry range. However, the BYOD phenomenon, which sees employees using their own devices for work, ensures the growing number of Android users will not have to wait long for their app, which is currently under development.

More billable hours

With law firms looking to squeeze more billable hours from fee-earners, these mobile apps, allow a more efficient use of their time. Fee-earners can now dictate in the car, on the train, sat outside court or in the police station, with the ability to send the sound files off for transcription, providing they have WiFi access.

The user-friendly app, allows one-touch recording, with simple editing controls ensuring precise dictation every time. A typical finger slider allows the user to scroll through the recording to find the exact point to insert further thoughts or important information, without overwriting the rest of the recording – no more tacking on extra thoughts at the end, hoping the typist will correctly identify the required insertion point.

Significant investment

DictateNow co-founder, Garry Park, comments on the release of the apps: “Developing these apps has involved significant investment in both time and money, but we’re pleased the end result will help lawyers work more efficiently. We have ensured the app is very easy to use and the many thousands of lawyers using our system in their office will certainly recognise the user-interface. Not only is it easy to record and edit dictation, it is a very simple process to send the files securely for transcription.

“One tap brings up the upload screen, where users will add the title, decide the priority for the dictation and enter the time it’s required. There is also the option to add notes that might address formatting or pronunciation and spelling issues.

Utilise internal resources

“Importantly, once registered on our system, users will have the option to choose where the sound files are sent for transcription, which might be back to their office to utilise internal resources. When these are unable to meet the deadline imposed, lawyers can route work directly to us for distribution to one of our more than 300 UK-based typists to ensure the transcribed files are received on time, every time.

“I think the days of lawyers tied to their desks are a thing of the past. The modern law firm is agile and efficient, with lawyers out meeting clients and working away from the office. Our app is designed to help lawyers take advantage of those often wasted few minutes during the working day.

Work smarter

“For everyone, it’s not about working harder, just smarter. We’re not advocating a lengthening of the working day, but if lawyers can use the commute home to finish or progress work, rather than working at home, that has to be an improvement on the current working day for many lawyers.”

* For more information about DictateNow please visit www.dictatenow.com – the app is available from the Apple iTunes App Store and the Blackberry equivalent.

One Comment

  1. Valerie I. VanOrden says:

    I was a medical transcriptionist 23 years and have not worked for a year now. Yes, this app may cut time in dictation transcription, but what about quality? Transcriptionists are now necessarily editors. Transcriptionists work for pennies a line now and do not work per hour like most folks. I see it as a win/lose situation. Many times dictators are in public places and compromise confidentiality.

Comment on Valerie I. VanOrden